View South at Judson and Circular: 1923 and Today

Once the Southern Pacific railroad tracks ran where I-280 freeway is today. Even in 1923, this was at the edges of the city. On the left is the Balboa Mill and Lumber Company, a yard with its own spur of track, replaced by houses in the 1940s. The presence of the freeway makes a precise match of views impossible (therefore no slider). View other comparison photographs here.

1923. View south from near Judson Avenue at the Southern Pacific railroad tracks. Photo:Western Railway Museum 259-V.
1923. View south from near Judson Avenue at the Southern Pacific railroad tracks. Photo: Western Railway Museum 259-V. View larger
2019. View south from Judson Ave at Circular. Photo: Amy O'Hair SunnysideHistory.org.
2019. View south from Judson Ave at Circular. Photo: Amy O’Hair SunnysideHistory.org. View larger 

View North at Judson and Circular: 1923 and Today

Looking north toward Sunnyside. At center left are the houses at 74 to 30 Staples Avenue, built in the 1910s. The little hut in the center is the Judson Avenue whistle stop for the Southern Pacific train, which was running only once a day or so by this time. On the right out of the frame is land that was cultivated for vegetables until the 1920s. Presence of the I-280 freeway makes a precise match impossible (therefore no slider). View other comparison photographs here.

1923. View north from near Judson, on Southern Pacific railroad tracks. Photo: Western Railway Museum 260-V.
1923. View north from near Judson, on Southern Pacific railroad tracks. Photo: Western Railway Museum 260-V. View larger 
2019. View north from Judson at Circular. Photo: Amy O'Hair SunnysideHistory.org
2019. View north from Judson at Circular. Photo: Amy O’Hair SunnysideHistory.org View larger 

 

Ocean and Frida Kahlo Way: 1980 and Today

Shot from the pedestrian overpass in 1980, this view of Ocean Avenue and Frida Kahlo Way (then Phelan Ave) shows the same transit-dense area as today, but with a few changes. Grand Auto Supply is gone, replaced with housing and retail at 1100-1250 Ocean (2011-2014). City College Station (aka Phelan Loop) was repositioned in 2013. The Ocean Ave Vet Hospital is still there, on left, 40 years on. The growth of a large tree next to the overpass made a precise match to the original impossible (therefore no slider). View more comparison photos here.

1980. View west from pedestrian overpass, Ocena Ave and Frida Kahlo Way. Photo: William J Madden OpenSFHistory.org
1980. View west from pedestrian overpass, Ocean Ave and Frida Kahlo Way. Photo: William J Madden OpenSFHistory.org View larger 
2019. View west from pedestrian overpass, Ocean Ave and Frida Kahlo Way. Photo: Amy O'Hair SunnysideHistory.org
2019. View west from pedestrian overpass, Ocean Ave and Frida Kahlo Way. Photo: Amy O’Hair SunnysideHistory.org View larger 

Built on Beer: The Streets of Sunnyside and San Francisco Brewery Profits

Investment money that funded the Sunnyside Land Company in 1890 was largely sourced from the hefty profits of some of San Francisco’s biggest late nineteenth-century breweries: Philadelphia Brewery, Albany Brewery, and United States Brewery—all overseen by the Brewer’s Protective Association. Men who were heirs to these fortunes, or wrapped up in the racket of propping up prices and selling off franchises to foreign capitalists, were among the most prominent initial investors in the Sunnyside project.

Behrend Joost, President of Sunnyside Land Company, was a notorious and irascible teetotaler[1], but he had no problem accepting beer-drenched money from his investors, who altogether put in one million dollars to fund the property speculation project. In return, many got their names or the places in Germany they came from on the newly laid-out streets.

2015-signs-Mangels-Baden

Five of the original Sunnyside streets—Mangels Avenue, Spreckels Avenue, Wieland Avenue, Baden Street, and Hamburg Street—I trace directly to these men.

Portion of the original Sunnyside Land Company homestead map, submitted to the city in 1891. View whole map here. https://sunnysidehistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/1891-Sunnyside-homestead-map-sm.jpg
Portion of the original Sunnyside Land Company homestead map, submitted to the city in 1891. View whole map here. 

In addition, Edna Street is likely to have been named for the beloved daughter of one of these brewery men. Read more