Sunnyside History in Photos: Places

A collection of photographs of places and things in Sunnyside’s history.

Photos of people in Sunnyside here. Main photo page here.  Do you have a photo to add? Write me.

One of big advertisements that launched the district. SF Chronicle, 26 Apr 1891.
One of big advertisements that launched the district. SF Chronicle, 26 Apr 1891.
1904. Sunnyside Powerhouse viewed from the east side near Monterey and Circular. Cooling pool, disused, visible in foreground. Read more about the powerhouse. Courtesy SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com
1904. Sunnyside Powerhouse, viewed from the east side near Monterey and Circular. Cooling pool, disused, visible in foreground. Courtesy SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com Read more about the powerhouse. 

One of many looney ads used to sell lots in the early years. SF Call, 13 May 1891.
One of many looney ads used to sell lots in the early years. SF Call, 13 May 1891. See more here. 
1893. Earliest known photograph of the Sunnyside Powerhouse. Cooling pond in operation. Monterey Blvd on right with streetcar. Street Railway Journal, July 1893.
1893. Earliest known photograph of the Sunnyside Powerhouse. Cooling pond in operation. Monterey Blvd on right with streetcar. Street Railway Journal, July 1893. Read more. 
1909. Workers breaking ground for the extension of the electric streetcar tracks down Monterey Blvd, near Detroit Street. SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com
1909. Workers breaking ground for the extension of the electric streetcar tracks down Monterey Blvd, near Detroit Street. SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com
1910c. The electric streetcar at its terminus, Monterey Blvd and Gennessee Street. More about the first electric streetcar in San Francisco. OpenSFHistory,org
1910c. The electric streetcar at its terminus, Monterey Blvd and Gennessee Street. OpenSFHistory,org  More about the first electric streetcar in San Francisco.
1904. Sunnyside Powerhouse, viewed from the west side on Monterey near Baden Street. Courtesy SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com
1904. Sunnyside Powerhouse, viewed from the west side on Monterey near Baden Street. Courtesy SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com. Read more about the powerhouse. 
1914. Temperance Merralls infront of the Sunnyside Conservatory, which William Merralls built in 1902. Read more about them here. Courtesy the Hartsough family.
1914. Temperance Merralls infront of the Sunnyside Conservatory, which William Merralls built in 1902. Read more about them here. Courtesy the Hartsough family.
The original interior of the Sunnyside Conservatory. Date unknown. Read more about William Merralls, who built the conservatory in 1902. From Here Today by Roger Olmsted (1968).
The original interior of the Sunnyside Conservatory. Date unknown. From Here Today by Roger Olmsted (1968). Read more about William Merralls, who built the conservatory in 1902. 
1968c. Sunnyside Conservatory, before purchase by the City. San Francisco Office of Assessor-Recorder Photographs Collection, San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Library
1968c. Sunnyside Conservatory, before purchase by the City. Still had two wings. San Francisco Office of Assessor-Recorder Photographs Collection, San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Library
The first Sunnyside School, in a small house. Operated 1896-1911. SF Chronicle, 23 Jul 1899.
The first Sunnyside School, in a small house. Operated 1896-1911. SF Chronicle, 23 Jul 1899. Newspapers.com. Read more about the school. 
1909. Sunnyside's first real school house. Near Foerster and Hearst, on the site of the present school's playground. Read more about the school. OpenSFHistory.org
1909. Sunnyside’s first real school house. Near Foerster and Hearst, on the site of the present school’s playground. Read more about the school. OpenSFHistory.orgMonterey Blvd (then Sunnyside Avenue) near Circular Avenue. Sunnyside Powerhouse in distance. SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com

Monterey Blvd (then Sunnyside Avenue) near Circular Avenue. Sunnyside Powerhouse in distance. SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com Read more about the powerhouse. 

1911. Goat grazing near Monterey Blvd (then Sunnyside Avenue) at Circular Ave. Sunnyside Powerhouse behind. Courtesy SFMTA afmta.photoshelter.com
1911. Cropped from previous image. Goat grazing near Monterey Blvd (then Sunnyside Avenue) at Circular Ave. Sunnyside Powerhouse behind. Courtesy SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com
1912. The "SUNNYSIDE" sign mounted on the side of the hill near Mangels Ave, part of the advertising campaign to sell lots. OpenSFHistory.org
1912. The “SUNNYSIDE” sign mounted for several years on the side of the hill near Mangels Ave, part of the advertising campaign to sell lots, which it might be seen here were moving rather slowly. OpenSFHistory.org Read more here.
1911. Monterey Blvd Between Joost and Circular. Read more about this photo. Courtesy SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com
1911. Monterey Blvd Between Joost and Circular. Courtesy SFMTA sfmta.photoshelter.com Read more about this photo.
1893. Car 13 of the San Francisco and San Mateo Electric Railway, which was developed by Behrend Joost simultaneously with district of Sunnyside. Western Railroader, 1975.
1893. Car 13 of the San Francisco and San Mateo Electric Railway, which was developed by Behrend Joost simultaneously with district of Sunnyside. Western Railroader, 1975. Read more. 
1934. Bus No.1, San Francisco's first cross-town bus, which ran from Monterey and Edna to Golden Gate Park. Read more here. San Francisco History Center. San Francisco Public Library.
1934. Bus No.1, San Francisco’s first cross-town bus, which ran from Monterey and Edna to Golden Gate Park. San Francisco History Center. San Francisco Public Library. Read more here.
1928c. The house at 350 Joost Ave. Courtesy Linda Doughty.
1928c. The house at 350 Joost Ave, where the Swansons lived, proud owners of a Ford Model A. Develoment was spotty before the 1920s. Courtesy Linda Doughty.
1940c. The No.10 electric streetcar on Monterey at Edna. The last streetcar ran a few years later, replaced by buses. OpenSFHistory.org
1940c. The No.10 electric streetcar on Monterey at Edna. The last streetcar ran a few years later, replaced by buses. OpenSFHistory.org
1940c. The No.10 electric streetcar on Monterey at Acadia. The last streetcar ran a few years later, replaced by buses. OpenSFHistory.org
1940c. The No.10 electric streetcar on Monterey at Acadia. OpenSFHistory.org
1942. The Foerster Slide filled the street with mud from Mount Davidson and knocked houses off their foundations. Foerster at Teresita. OpenSFHistory.org.
1942. The Foerster Slide filled the street with mud from Mount Davidson and knocked houses off their foundations. Foerster at Teresita. OpenSFHistory.org.
The sleek lines of the streamline moderne garage at 300 Monterey, now gone. Built by local impresario Tony Molinari in 1949. Courtesy Michelle Molinari.
The sleek lines of the streamline-moderne garage at 300 Monterey Blvd, now gone. Built by local impresario Tony Molinari in 1949. Courtesy Michelle Molinari. Every block along Monterey Blvd had a gas station for much of the mid-20th century. The last station (at Ridgewood) was removed in 1993.
!941. Monterey Blvd at the Detroit Steps. Billboards were common along Monterey before the aprtment-building boom of the 1950s-1970s. OpenSFHistory.org.
!941. Monterey Blvd at the Detroit Steps. Billboards were common along Monterey before the apartment-building boom of the 1950s-1970s. OpenSFHistory.org. Read more about Monterey development.

 

 

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.